The Paleo Network
Recipe: Quail’s Eggs, Bacon and Crispy Asparagus

Ever had quail’s eggs for a #paleo breakfast?

I never thought it would be possible, but sometimes I do get bored of ‘plain’ eggs and bacon for breakfast. A great way to break out of egg monotony is to vary your egg source – duck, goose, bantam and even ostrich eggs are all delicious, but my personal favourite is Quail’s Eggs. They have long been paired with asparagus, and this classic combination gets a twist with some bacon and finely…

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My Aldi paleo shopping list

My Aldi paleo shopping list

I have a confession… I don’tgrow all of my own food or shop exclusively from farmers markets, organic butchers and fishmongers. With a long commute and long hours, I often just don’t have the time to source my food in the way I’d like. Believe it or not, I’ve found Aldi can be a fairly good place to buy Paleo friendly food. Whilst it’s clearly not the same as knowing the farm(er) your food came…

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New Post has been published on http://paleo.com.au/2014/07/aldi-paleo-shopping-list/My Aldi paleo shopping listI have a confession… I don’t grow all of my own food or shop exclusively from farmers markets, organic butchers and fishmongers. With a long commute and long hours, I often just don’t have the time to source my food in the way I’d like. Believe it or not, I’ve found Aldi can be a fairly good place to buy Paleo friendly food. Whilst it’s clearly not the same as knowing the farm(er) your food came from, I think it can be a good compromise. It also tends to be far cheaper than my other local supermarket options (i.e. Coles and Woolworths).

I thought I’d share with you my Aldi paleo picks…
Meat & Poultry

Aldi sell “Highland Park” beef – it’s grass-fed! We like grass-fed! As you know, I don’t buy mince/ ground beef, but I have tried the Highland Park Steaks ($17.99 – $25.99/kg depending on the cut)
They also stock Willowton free range chicken  (thighs, breast and drumsticks)
Butter

Butter is another good buy (but is it paleo?) as Aldi have an organic butter for under $3 a pack

Nuts

Nuts are another staple that I use just for a snack, in a no-oatmeal or occasionally for a bit of paleo baking. I’ve seen the Forresters brand of natural almonds and also raw walnuts in my local Aldi.

Eggs
 
I’ve not actually tried Aldi’s eggs yet, but they do sell free range eggs.

Oil

Whilst I’ve never seen coconut oil in Aldi, they do have an Australian olive oil that seems quite good for just under $5.


Berries

My final paleo in a pinch purchase at Aldi is frozen berries (Sweet Haven brand), which are handy to keep in the freezer for smoothies or even a quick ice cream.

Have you tried any paleo friendly foods from Aldi? What did you think?

New Post has been published on http://paleo.com.au/2014/07/aldi-paleo-shopping-list/

My Aldi paleo shopping list

I have a confession… I don’t grow all of my own food or shop exclusively from farmers markets, organic butchers and fishmongers. With a long commute and long hours, I often just don’t have the time to source my food in the way I’d like. Believe it or not, I’ve found Aldi can be a fairly good place to buy Paleo friendly food. Whilst it’s clearly not the same as knowing the farm(er) your food came from, I think it can be a good compromise. It also tends to be far cheaper than my other local supermarket options (i.e. Coles and Woolworths).

Aldi Goes Paleo

I thought I’d share with you my Aldi paleo picks…

Meat & Poultry

Aldi sell “Highland Park” beef – it’s grass-fed! We like grass-fed! As you know, I don’t buy mince/ ground beef, but I have tried the Highland Park Steaks ($17.99 – $25.99/kg depending on the cut)

They also stock Willowton free range chicken  (thighs, breast and drumsticks)

Butter

Butter is another good buy (but is it paleo?) as Aldi have an organic butter for under $3 a pack

Aldi organic salted butter paleo

Nuts

Nuts are another staple that I use just for a snack, in a no-oatmeal or occasionally for a bit of paleo baking. I’ve seen the Forresters brand of natural almonds and also raw walnuts in my local Aldi.

Eggs

 

I’ve not actually tried Aldi’s eggs yet, but they do sell free range eggs.

Oil

Whilst I’ve never seen coconut oil in Aldi, they do have an Australian olive oil that seems quite good for just under $5.

Aldi Australian organic olive oil paleo

Berries

My final paleo in a pinch purchase at Aldi is frozen berries (Sweet Haven brand), which are handy to keep in the freezer for smoothies or even a quick ice cream.

Have you tried any paleo friendly foods from Aldi? What did you think?

The Paleo Recipe Book
Recipe: Perfect Oxtail and Veggie One Pot

How about a bit of oxtail?

Whether you call it a stew, a casserole, or a one pot – nothing beats a big, steaming bowl of tender meat, juicy veggies and rich gravy. Oxtail is a cheap and highly nutritious cut, and is perfect for stewing. However, the key to this recipe is the umami rich flavours that just dance on your palate, making this one pot one of the best tasting (and best value) recipes you’ll make in a long time.

Paleo recipe Perfect Oxtail Veggie One Pot

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New Post has been published on http://paleo.com.au/2014/07/recipe-perfect-oxtail-veggie-one-pot/Recipe: Perfect Oxtail and Veggie One PotWhether you call it a stew, a casserole, or a one pot – nothing beats a big, steaming bowl of tender meat, juicy veggies and rich gravy. Oxtail is a cheap and highly nutritious cut, and is perfect for stewing. However, the key to this recipe is the umami rich flavours that just dance on your palate, making this one pot one of the best tasting (and best value) recipes you’ll make in a long time.

Oxtail Ingredients:
1.5kg oxtail, diced
Salt and black pepper
1 tsp allspice
1 tbsp coconut oil or lard
2 white onions, sliced
4 cloves garlic, crushed
2 beef tomatoes, diced
4 bay leaves
A few sprigs fresh thyme
A few sprigs fresh rosemary
1 cinnamon stick
1 x 400g tins chopped tomatoes
½ litre homemade (or organic) beef stock
4 tbsp coconut aminos
4 tbsp red wine vinegar
6 large carrots, diced
1 large cauliflower, chopped into florets
2 tbsp arrowroot starch (optional)
Oxtail How To:
1) Rub the oxtail with a generous amount of salt and pepper, and the allspice. Heat the coconut oil (or lard) in your largest stock pot, and cook the oxtail for about 10 minutes until browned all over. Remove for the heat but retain the meat juices.
2) Add the diced onions to the pan, and cook gently for 5 minutes in the meat juices before adding the garlic and cooking for another 2. Throw in the tomatoes, bay leaves, thyme, rosemary, and the cinnamon stick, before pouring in the chopped tomatoes and beef stock. Turn up the heat and bring to the boil.
3) When the liquid is simmering, return the oxtail to the pot. Stir in the coconut aminos and red wine vinegar, before turning the heat down to low and covering the pot. Simmer gently for around 3 hours.
4) Add the carrots and cauliflower to the pot before popping the lid back on and cooking for another 30 minutes. 10 minutes before serving, stir in the arrowroot (if using) to thicken the gravy.

New Post has been published on http://paleo.com.au/2014/07/recipe-perfect-oxtail-veggie-one-pot/

Recipe: Perfect Oxtail and Veggie One Pot

Whether you call it a stew, a casserole, or a one pot – nothing beats a big, steaming bowl of tender meat, juicy veggies and rich gravy. Oxtail is a cheap and highly nutritious cut, and is perfect for stewing. However, the key to this recipe is the umami rich flavours that just dance on your palate, making this one pot one of the best tasting (and best value) recipes you’ll make in a long time.

Paleo recipe Perfect Oxtail Veggie One Pot

Oxtail Ingredients:

  • 1.5kg oxtail, diced
  • Salt and black pepper
  • 1 tsp allspice
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil or lard
  • 2 white onions, sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 beef tomatoes, diced
  • 4 bay leaves
  • A few sprigs fresh thyme
  • A few sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 x 400g tins chopped tomatoes
  • ½ litre homemade (or organic) beef stock
  • 4 tbsp coconut aminos
  • 4 tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 6 large carrots, diced
  • 1 large cauliflower, chopped into florets
  • 2 tbsp arrowroot starch (optional)

Oxtail How To:

1) Rub the oxtail with a generous amount of salt and pepper, and the allspice. Heat the coconut oil (or lard) in your largest stock pot, and cook the oxtail for about 10 minutes until browned all over. Remove for the heat but retain the meat juices.

2) Add the diced onions to the pan, and cook gently for 5 minutes in the meat juices before adding the garlic and cooking for another 2. Throw in the tomatoes, bay leaves, thyme, rosemary, and the cinnamon stick, before pouring in the chopped tomatoes and beef stock. Turn up the heat and bring to the boil.

3) When the liquid is simmering, return the oxtail to the pot. Stir in the coconut aminos and red wine vinegar, before turning the heat down to low and covering the pot. Simmer gently for around 3 hours.

4) Add the carrots and cauliflower to the pot before popping the lid back on and cooking for another 30 minutes. 10 minutes before serving, stir in the arrowroot (if using) to thicken the gravy.

The Paleo Recipe Book
Recipe: Braised Wild Rabbit with Glazed Apples, Bacon and Shallots

Admit it - when did you last cook with rabbit?

Many people are put off eating rabbit because they are, let’s face it, incredibly cute. However, wild rabbit is one of the most sustainable meats you can buy, and you can guarantee it will have enjoyed a diet free of GM foods and artificial hormones. When simmered in a flavoursome liquid, it becomes incredibly tender. And who doesn’t love smoky bacon and sticky, caramelised apples to go with it?…

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New Post has been published on http://paleo.com.au/2014/07/recipe-braised-wild-rabbit-glazed-apples-bacon-shallots/Recipe: Braised Wild Rabbit with Glazed Apples, Bacon and ShallotsMany people are put off eating rabbit because they are, let’s face it, incredibly cute. However, wild rabbit is one of the most sustainable meats you can buy, and you can guarantee it will have enjoyed a diet free of GM foods and artificial hormones. When simmered in a flavoursome liquid, it becomes incredibly tender. And who doesn’t love smoky bacon and sticky, caramelised apples to go with it? Feel free to add some root vegetables into the pot with your rabbit to enhance the flavour – carrots, swede and parsnips would all work. 
Braised Wild Rabbit Ingredients:
One large rabbit, jointed and chopped into 5cm dice
1 tbsp coconut oil
200ml apple juice
250ml home made chicken stock
Few sprigs fresh thyme
Few sprigs fresh rosemary
2 bay leaves
200g smoky bacon
4 medium shallots, chopped
2 large apples, chopped into wedges
Pinch cinnamon
 Braised Wild Rabbit How To:
1)     Heat the coconut oil in a casserole dish. Add the rabbit, and cook for 5 minutes or so until browned. Pour in the apple juice and stock, before adding the thyme, rosemary and bay. Bring to the boil, cover and simmer for an hour. 2)     10 minutes before serving, heat a little extra coconut oil in a frying pan. Add the bacon and cook for a couple of minutes until it starts to release its fat. Add the shallots and apples, a sauté for a further 7 or 8 minutes until sticky and caramelised. Finish with a good pinch of cinnamon, and serve alongside the rabbit.

New Post has been published on http://paleo.com.au/2014/07/recipe-braised-wild-rabbit-glazed-apples-bacon-shallots/

Recipe: Braised Wild Rabbit with Glazed Apples, Bacon and Shallots

Many people are put off eating rabbit because they are, let’s face it, incredibly cute. However, wild rabbit is one of the most sustainable meats you can buy, and you can guarantee it will have enjoyed a diet free of GM foods and artificial hormones. When simmered in a flavoursome liquid, it becomes incredibly tender. And who doesn’t love smoky bacon and sticky, caramelised apples to go with it? Feel free to add some root vegetables into the pot with your rabbit to enhance the flavour – carrots, swede and parsnips would all work. Paleo Dinner Recipe  Braised Wild Rabbit Glazed Apples Bacon Shallots

Braised Wild Rabbit Ingredients:

  • One large rabbit, jointed and chopped into 5cm dice
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 200ml apple juice
  • 250ml home made chicken stock
  • Few sprigs fresh thyme
  • Few sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 200g smoky bacon
  • 4 medium shallots, chopped
  • 2 large apples, chopped into wedges
  • Pinch cinnamon

 Braised Wild Rabbit How To:

1)     Heat the coconut oil in a casserole dish. Add the rabbit, and cook for 5 minutes or so until browned. Pour in the apple juice and stock, before adding the thyme, rosemary and bay. Bring to the boil, cover and simmer for an hour. 2)     10 minutes before serving, heat a little extra coconut oil in a frying pan. Add the bacon and cook for a couple of minutes until it starts to release its fat. Add the shallots and apples, a sauté for a further 7 or 8 minutes until sticky and caramelised. Finish with a good pinch of cinnamon, and serve alongside the rabbit.

The Paleo Recipe Book
Recipe: Paleo Paella

Have you ever tried making your own (#paleo) Paella?

Yet another recipe that proves cauliflower riceis just as good (if not better) as the real thing. I love the combination of flavours and textures that is unique to Paella – what other dish in the world will you find prawns, anchovies, chicken and bacon altogether, delicately infused with smoked paprika and saffron? I can’t think of any, so what better reason to enjoy this super easy one pan dish…

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New Post has been published on http://paleo.com.au/2014/07/recipe-paleo-paella/Recipe: Paleo PaellaYet another recipe that proves cauliflower rice is just as good (if not better) as the real thing. I love the combination of flavours and textures that is unique to Paella – what other dish in the world will you find prawns, anchovies, chicken and bacon altogether, delicately infused with smoked paprika and saffron? I can’t think of any, so what better reason to enjoy this super easy one pan dish with the whole family.

Paleo Paella Ingredients:

2 medium cauliflowers
1 tsp coconut oil
4 skinless and boneless chicken thigh fillets
6 – 8 rashers of smoked streaky bacon, diced
1 large red onion, sliced
4 cloves garlic, diced
1 tsp smoked paprika
A pinch saffron
2 bay leaves
1 litre home made (or organic) chicken stock
2 large tomatoes, diced
2 large handfuls green peas
15 – 20 large prawns, shelled
6 Anchovies, diced
Black pepper
Handful fresh oregano
 Paleo Paella How To:
 
1)     Blitz the heads of both cauliflowers in your food processor until it resembles rice (you may need to do this in separate batches depending on the size of your food processor). Set aside.
2)     Heat the coconut oil in your largest, heavy based pan. Dice the chicken thighs into thumb sized pieces. When the pan is at a high heat, fry the chicken for about 5 minutes until golden brown. Set aside, keeping the juices in the pan.
3)     Return the pan to a medium heat. Add the bacon, sliced red onion, garlic and paprika and stir fry for a couple of minutes, making sure they don’t burn. Add the cauliflower rice, paprika and bay, before pouring in the stock and sprinkling on the saffron. Don’t put the saffron in the pan before the stock – it’s very delicate and this will impair the flavour.
4)     Return the chicken to the pan. Leave to simmer for about 10 minutes, until most of the liquid is absorbed. Stir regularly.
5)     Add the diced tomatoes, green peas, prawns and anchovies to the pan for a further 5 minutes cooking time. When all the liquid is absorbed, serve garnished with the fresh oregano. There’s no need for salt thanks to the anchovies, but season with a generous amount of black pepper.
Are you a Paella fan? What do you put in yours?

New Post has been published on http://paleo.com.au/2014/07/recipe-paleo-paella/

Recipe: Paleo Paella

Yet another recipe that proves cauliflower rice is just as good (if not better) as the real thing. I love the combination of flavours and textures that is unique to Paella – what other dish in the world will you find prawns, anchovies, chicken and bacon altogether, delicately infused with smoked paprika and saffron? I can’t think of any, so what better reason to enjoy this super easy one pan dish with the whole family.

Paleo Dinner Paleo Paella Spanish Seafood

Paleo Paella Ingredients:

  • 2 medium cauliflowers
  • 1 tsp coconut oil
  • 4 skinless and boneless chicken thigh fillets
  • 6 – 8 rashers of smoked streaky bacon, diced
  • 1 large red onion, sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic, diced
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • A pinch saffron
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 litre home made (or organic) chicken stock
  • 2 large tomatoes, diced
  • 2 large handfuls green peas
  • 15 – 20 large prawns, shelled
  • 6 Anchovies, diced
  • Black pepper
  • Handful fresh oregano

 Paleo Paella How To:

 
1)     Blitz the heads of both cauliflowers in your food processor until it resembles rice (you may need to do this in separate batches depending on the size of your food processor). Set aside.

2)     Heat the coconut oil in your largest, heavy based pan. Dice the chicken thighs into thumb sized pieces. When the pan is at a high heat, fry the chicken for about 5 minutes until golden brown. Set aside, keeping the juices in the pan.

3)     Return the pan to a medium heat. Add the bacon, sliced red onion, garlic and paprika and stir fry for a couple of minutes, making sure they don’t burn. Add the cauliflower rice, paprika and bay, before pouring in the stock and sprinkling on the saffron. Don’t put the saffron in the pan before the stock – it’s very delicate and this will impair the flavour.

4)     Return the chicken to the pan. Leave to simmer for about 10 minutes, until most of the liquid is absorbed. Stir regularly.

5)     Add the diced tomatoes, green peas, prawns and anchovies to the pan for a further 5 minutes cooking time. When all the liquid is absorbed, serve garnished with the fresh oregano. There’s no need for salt thanks to the anchovies, but season with a generous amount of black pepper.

Are you a Paella fan? What do you put in yours?

The Paleo Recipe Book
Recipe: Potato free Aloo Gobi

Who said Aloo Gobi isn’t #paleo?http://wp.me/p4Da62-52RG

What’s your favourite part of Aloo Gobi? Is it the blend of warming, aromatic spices? Perhaps the crispness of the cauliflower? Whatever it is, I’d guess it’s certainly not the potatoes. Whether you’re avoiding potatoes because they’re a nightshade, or you just don’t care for the insulin spike, you won’t miss them in this adapted Aloo Gobi. Double the cauliflower just means double the goodness –…

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