Recipe: Lemony Broccoli

If you’re trying to get more greens into your diet (and you should be!) you might as well make sure they taste amazing. I have a lot of broccoli and find it can get a bit samey, so I came up with this recipe to give it a bit of a kick. You can give it an even bigger kick by increasing the amount of chilli you add!

Paleo Diet Recipe Lemony Broccoli
Lemony Broccoli Ingredients:
  • A clove of garlic
  • Pinch sea salt
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon…

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Recipe: Lemony Broccoli

If you’re trying to get more greens into your diet (and you should be!) you might as well make sure they taste amazing. I have a lot of broccoli and find it can get a bit samey, so I came up with this recipe to give it a bit of a kick. You can give it an even bigger kick by increasing the amount of chilli you add!

Paleo Diet Recipe Lemony Broccoli
Lemony Broccoli Ingredients:

  • A clove of garlic
  • Pinch sea salt
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoons freshly diced chilli (increase for more of a kick!)
  • 1 lemon, juice & zest
  • 150ml (5 floz) hot water
  • 1 handful fresh broccoli
  • Pinch flaked almonds

Lemony Broccoli How To:

1) Peel & grind up the garlic and salt using a food processor (or pestle & mortar). Add in a dash of the olive oil and stir the mixture.

2) Transfer the mixture to a pan and add in the rest of the olive oil and the chilli. Heat over a medium heat and stir until it starts to simmer. Add in the lemon juice and water as necessary to stop it sticking to the pan. Keep the mixture warm over a medium heat.

3) Steam the broccoli for three minutes until tender.

4) Dry fry the almonds in a pan until they turn golden.

5) Combine the broccoli, sauce & lemon zest and top with the almonds.

Serve and enjoy!

The Paleo Recipe Book

9 surprising ways to get your five a day

9 surprising ways to get your five a day

We all know we’re supposed to eat five portions of fruit and vegetables a day. Apparently it doesn’t really matter what you choose for your five portions, more fruit than veg, it makes no difference. Whether your portions are frozen, canned, dried or part of a drink – it’s all good.

Agree?
9 surprising ways to get your five a day

Well, in the interest of your health, I now present nine different ways you can get to your five a day. And…

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9 surprising ways to get your five a day

We all know we’re supposed to eat five portions of fruit and vegetables a day. Apparently it doesn’t really matter what you choose for your five portions, more fruit than veg, it makes no difference. Whether your portions are frozen, canned, dried or part of a drink – it’s all good.

Agree?
9 surprising ways to get your five a day

Well, in the interest of your health, I now present nine different ways you can get to your five a day. And of course once you’ve got there, you can eat whatever you like for the rest of the day!

1. A bottle of fruit juice

That’s right, 150ml of processed fruit juice is enough to tick of one of your 5 daily portions of fruit and vegetables. So they may have up to 8 teaspoons of sugar in a bottle – but that’s not important enough for us to worry about.

Paleo diet five a day fruit veg orange juice

2. Baked Beans

Who knew? Apparently the sauce alone is nutritious enough to count as a portion. Don’t worry yourself about the added sugar, they’re clearly a health food.

Paleo diet five a day fruit veg heinz baked beans

3. Fruit Chips/ Crisps

Just replace the potato chips with fruit chips and you’re winning! The best thing is that as they’re dried, the sugars are concentrated making them even more appealing!

Paleo diet five a day fruit veg apple crisps

4. Sweets/ Lollies/ Candy

Why have broccoli as one of your portions when you have have the sweet stuff!

Paleo diet five a day fruit veg sea snacks
5. More Sweets/ Lollies/ Candy

Best to have two packets, rather than one, to get you closer to your five a day…

Paleo diet five a day fruit veg raspberry crispie tiddlers
6. Fruit Juice

Water you say? No – that won’t help you get to your five a day target. Have a fruit shoot instead. (Ingredients: Water, Sugar, Orange Juice from Concentrate (8%), Citric Acid, Natural Flavouring, Antioxidant (Ascorbic Acid), Preservatives (Potassium Sorbate, Dimethyl Dicarbonate), Stabiliser (Xanthan Gum), Natural Colour (Carotenes) – that’s all healthy good stuff, right?)
Paleo diet five a day fruit veg robinsons fruit shoot

7. McDonalds Soda

You know those days when it’s really hard to find anywhere to buy fruit and vegetables? Well luckily for you McDonalds can help you get your five a day.
Paleo diet five a day fruit veg mcdonalds soda fruitizz

8. Pasta Shapes

Pasta. Shapes. Are. Good. For. You.
Paleo diet five a day fruit veg heinz pasta shapes

9. Strawberry Bars

Marketed directly at school children make sure you incorporate these in your diet. They’ve even got healthy vegetable oil them.

Ingredients: Concentrated Apple Puree (an average of 282g Apple used to prepare 100g of School Bars®), Dehydrated Apple (20%), Maltodextrin, Oligofructose, Vegetable Oil, Concentrated Juices of Apple (3%), Strawberry (1.8%) and Pear (1%), Gelling Agent (Pectin), Natural Colour (Anthocyanins), Natural Flavouring, Malic Acid, Preservative (Sodium Metabisulphite)
Paleo diet five a day fruit veg fruit bar school bars

I hope this post has helped you out. Have you had your five a day today?

The Paleo Recipe Book

Recipe: Seared Pork, Pear and Fennel Salad

Paleo lunch recipe: Seared Pork, Pear and Fennel Salad

This recipe is fresh, light, and oh so summery – perfect for an Al Fresco lunch or a light evening meal. I love how well the sweetness of the pear compliments the pork and the fennel; and I hope you do too!

Paleo lunch dinner recipe Seared Pork, Pear and Fennel Salad

Seared Pork Ingredients:
  • 75g watercress
  • 75g rocket
  • Small handful fresh parsley, roughly chopped
  • 1 ripe pear, diced
  • 6 radishes, sliced
  • 2 pork chops
  • 1 bulb fennel, outer layer…

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Recipe: Seared Pork, Pear and Fennel Salad

This recipe is fresh, light, and oh so summery – perfect for an Al Fresco lunch or a light evening meal. I love how well the sweetness of the pear compliments the pork and the fennel; and I hope you do too!

Paleo lunch dinner recipe Seared Pork, Pear and Fennel Salad

Seared Pork Ingredients:

  • 75g watercress
  • 75g rocket
  • Small handful fresh parsley, roughly chopped
  • 1 ripe pear, diced
  • 6 radishes, sliced
  • 2 pork chops
  • 1 bulb fennel, outer layer removed and chopped into slices 1cm thick
  • Olive oil
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • Handful crushed walnuts
  • Sea Salt
  • Black Pepper

Seared Pork How To:

1) In a bowl, toss together the watercress, rocket, parsley, pear and radishes. Divide this between two salad bowls.

2) Roll a rolling pin over your pork chops to flatten them to about 2cm thick. Drizzle with a little olive oil, and season liberally with salt and black pepper.

3) Heat a cast iron griddle to a high heat. Place the pork and the fennel slices on to it at the same time, and sear for 2 / 3 minutes each side, until the pork is cooked through and the fennel nicely golden.

4) Allow the meat to rest for 2 minutes, before cutting into strips with a sharp knife. Scatter the pork strips and the fennel slices over the salads. Finish with a good drizzle of olive oil, lemon zest, and a handful of crushed walnuts.

The Paleo Recipe Book

Dessert for diabetics

My gran is just about to start receiving “Meals on Wheels”, which is a great service. In principle. Vulnerable people (mainly the elderly) are provided with a cooked nutritious meal at lunchtime. For many recipients, this will be the main nutrition they get in that day, so it’s really important that the meal provides the nutrition they need. Especially for those with conditions like diabetes,…

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Dessert for diabetics

My gran is just about to start receiving “Meals on Wheels”, which is a great service. In principle. Vulnerable people (mainly the elderly) are provided with a cooked nutritious meal at lunchtime. For many recipients, this will be the main nutrition they get in that day, so it’s really important that the meal provides the nutrition they need. Especially for those with conditions like diabetes, you’d think?

Dessert for diabetics diabetes

Each day (it’s even available on Saturdays and Sunday’s) they offer a choice of a main course and a choice of dessert. The main course choices, as you might expect are a traditional meat based meal, or a vegetarian option. And the desserts? Yep, hot, cold or diabetic.

Diabetic Meals on Wheels

I was really shocked to see diabetic desserts – and even more surprised to see what they are. You’d maybe expect low-carb options, like a cheese board perhaps. But no, they’re traditional sweet desserts, such as cakes and pies.

Looking at the definition I found on the web of what the diabetic options should consist of, it’s clear the providers of nutrition are stuck with conventional wisdom. “Desserts for diabetics must be sweetened with artificial sweeteners or sweeteners combined with a minimal amount of sugar”.

Diabetic definitions meals on wheels

How about making desserts sugar (and sweetener free) entirely – or even swapping the dessert out for a starter instead!? Where did the idea that all meals must be finished with a dessert come from anyway?

As meals on wheels only provides one meal a day, they have some helpful recommendations as to what diabetics should eat for the rest of their meals:

Diabetic recommendations

That’s right – diabetics should get 6-11 servings of bread and grains a day! DIABETICS! Also, note the low-fat recommendations. Those diabetics have got to steer well clear of anything so much as resembling fat, and instead go for low-fat options, that have replaced the fat with carbohydrates. Oh, and fruit – go right ahead.

I’d love to hear our comments on the diabetic nutrition for the most vulnerable diabetics in our communities. What meals do you think they should be offered?

The Paleo Recipe Book

Recipe: Brussels sprouts made nice

Recipe: Brussels sprouts made nice

Didn’t think you liked Brussels sprouts? Hold back your judgement until you’ve tried this recipe!

Brussels sprouts are such an amazing source of nutrients packed with vitamin A, vitamin C, folate and so much goodness, if you’ve not liked them so far it’s definitely worth giving them another try.

Paleo diet recipe Brussels sprouts made niceThis recipe is a great side to a meaty dinner, or perfect on its own, with a serve of cauliflower rice.

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Recipe: Brussels sprouts made nice

Didn’t think you liked Brussels sprouts? Hold back your judgement until you’ve tried this recipe!

Brussels sprouts are such an amazing source of nutrients packed with vitamin A, vitamin C, folate and so much goodness, if you’ve not liked them so far it’s definitely worth giving them another try.

Paleo diet recipe Brussels sprouts made niceThis recipe is a great side to a meaty dinner, or perfect on its own, with a serve of cauliflower rice.

Brussels sprouts made nice ingredients:

  • 100g (3.5 oz) Brussels sprouts
  • Splash olive oil
  • 8 rashers bacon, diced
  • 2 large carrots, peeled & diced
  • Knob of butter (or use extra olive oil, if you don’t do dairy)
  • Sea salt & black pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon of chopped coriander (cilantro)
  • 1 tablespoon of hazelnuts, chopped

Brussels sprouts made nice how to:

1) Peel the exterior leaves off the sprouts & remove the tough ends. Cut the sprouts in half & finely slice them.

2) Heat the oil in a pan and fry the bacon for a few minutes. Add the carrots and cook for a further 5 minutes, making sure you keep stiring to prevent it from sticking.

3) Add the butter (or extra olive oil) to the pan along with the sprouts, and stir for another five minutes. You need to keep heating until the sprouts have started to soften, but still have some crunch in their texture.

4) Season and serve, garnishing with the coriander (cilantro) and hazelnuts.

I’d love to hear how you cook Brussels Sprouts to make them taste amazing! Please share you secrets in the comments below!

The Paleo Recipe Book